When you are the last team to make their first selection in a draft, you do not expect to be acquiring any household names. That was the situation the New York Rangers faced during the 2013 NHL Draft as the Blueshirts sat through 64 previous selections before entering the draft with the 65th overall pick.

You can just imagine how anxious Rangers Director of Player Personnel Gordie Clark must have been getting waiting for his turn to draft.

“I just never had sat there and watched so much talent walk by our table to get to the podium, and even in the second (round) where there are so many good names,” Clark explained to Jim Cerny of BlueshirtsUnited.com.

“But I would never give Nash back for that first (round pick), and Ryane Clowe was such a big part of our march after the trade deadline. It was interesting, though, how it went because you just had to wait and watch all of these players go off the board. But in the end we liked who we got.”

However, low and behold, the Rangers did manage to reach out and draft a player with a household name – sort of.

If family lineage has anything to do with playing in the NHL, Adam Tambellini is destined for an NHL career. His father Steve was the New York Islanders first draft choice (#15) in the 1978 NHL Draft. The former Edmonton Oilers GM played for four NHL teams scoring 160 goals and 150 assist in 553 games while winning the Stanley Cup with the 1980 Islanders.

Older brother Jeff was the second of two first round draft picks (#27) of the Los Angeles Kings in 2003. The Kings drafted Brian Boyle one pick ahead of Jeff. Big brother played four three NHL teams and scored 27 goals and 36 assists in 242 NHL games. Jeff has played the last two years with Zurich in the Swiss A League.

“He’s a lot like his bloodlines,” Central Scouting’s B.J. MacDonald told Mike G. Morreale of NHL.com.

“He’s very good with the puck and has really nice size. People were waiting for the trade, and at Christmas his game took off. He’s got an NHL shot and can score … he has a nice wrist shot as well. He can beat goalies clean from the dots on that wrister. He’s got a quick release, is efficient and intelligent.”

MacDonald was not the only person who liked Tambellini’s bloodlines and NHL connection.

“There’s no question,” Clark admitted to Cerny. “I think a lot of Steve Tambellini. I remember watching his other son. He was shorter and faster, this one taller and more of a playmaker. Both of them have Steve’s shot. They have NHL shots. He needs to put a little weight on and he’ll have time to do that at North Dakota.

“It’s kind of like [Carl] Hagelin. We projected he might be there four years, and he came out all right. North Dakota’s put a bunch of players in the NHL.”

Tambellini was one of 18 draftees who counted ties to former or current NHL family members.

Adam’s NHL start will be delayed a few years as he is set to attend the University of North Dakota this year where he will spend some time building up his 6-foot-2 and 158 pound frame. The C/LW last season with Surrey and Vernon of the BCHL and scored 36 goals with 29 assists in 52 games.

Tambellini was on the radar of the following Scouting Services: NHL Central Scouting (CS) (#42 North American skater), International Scouting Service (ISS) (#93), The Hockey News (THN) (#33), and McKeen’s (McK) (#69).

Here is Tambellini’s ISS Scouting Report: “Few players have shown as much development on the ice in the past two seasons as Adam Tambellini. [He] is a perfect example of how a late birthday can work to a player’s advantage. Tambellini established himself as a premier forward in the BCJL this year. He has good size, works hard and thinks the game very well. His offensive timing and net presence are very strong which makes him a very dangerous offensive player during zone play. He has good hands, moves well for his size and can play in all situations. He has shown up in all the big games this year for his team.”

While the Rangers sat and waited two plus rounds before making their first selection, they only had to wait a few minutes before exercising their next two picks – both in the third round (# 75 and #80).

With their middle third round pick, the Blueshirts drafted Russian LW Pavel Buchnevich and then finished up the third round by drafting QMJHL LW Anthony Duclair.

Adam Kimelman praised the Rangers for selecting the pair of LWs.

“The Rangers got good value for their picks. Russian left wing Pavel Buchnevich, the second of three third-round picks, was highly regarded for his skill,” Kimelman wrote on THN’s web site.

“The third third-round pick, left wing Anthony Duclair, got a good hockey education from Patrick Roy the past two seasons with the Quebec Remparts,” the NHL.com columnist wrote.

The 6-foot-1 and 161 pound Russian played for Cherepovets last season. In 24 games with their Junior Team, Buchnevich scored 8 goals and 15 assists. The youngster also played in 12 KHL games with Cherepovets adding a goal and an assist as a teenager. One of his assistant coaches with Cherepovets was former Rangers forward Vladimir Vorobiev. Clark compared Buchnevich to former Rangers 1st round draft pick the late Alexei Cherepanov.

Buchnevich received solid rankings from three of the above Scouting Services: CS (#10 European skater), (ISS) (#34), THN (#Not Rated), and McK (#76). Craig Button, former NHL GM and current TSN analyst, had him rated as the 33rd best player.

Morreale offered up the following tidbit on Pavel.

“Buchnevich, who is No. 10 on Central Scouting’s list of the top European skaters, told NHL.com he will spend two more seasons in the KHL before coming to North America. He has two years remaining on his contract with Cherepovets. The 6-1, 176-pound left-handed shot is very strong on the puck and offers a tremendous wrist shot and one-timer.”

NHL Director of European Scouting Goran Stubb commented to Morreale that, “He has great offensive instincts but needs to improve his defensive game. He does have all the tools to become a star.”

Here is Buchnevich’s ISS Scouting Report: “The only Russian U-18 player to play more than one game in the KHL this season, Buchnevich really burst onto the scene this year and managed to showcase himself well at all the major events and high exposure situations he attended.”

“Buchnevich has good size, controls the puck well but thinks the game very quickly and can execute with very little time or space available. He is confident and manages to find his way to the high slot often without the puck and times with the puck and defenders draped all over him. He is a dangerous shooter who can place his shots well and pick corners but is even more dangerous considering his vision and instinct with the puck, using quick fakes and look-offs to set up wide-open teammates.”

ISS also wrote: “Needs to add muscle [and] not always the most intense [player]. ISS compares him to Johan Franzen and sees him as a “2nd-3rd line player who can be relied on for offensive production and PP contributions.”

The third of the trio of 3rd round picks was a player I wrote about in my Third Round Draft Preview – Anthony Duclair. Interestingly enough, the draft guides that I had listed him as a RW, but the Rangers list him as a LW – which was a position the organization was looking to strengthen.

The 5-foot-11 and 180 pound Duclair played 55 games with Quebec (QMJHL) and scored 20 goals and 30 assists – a decrease from his rookie season when he scored 31 goals and 35 assists in 63 games. It appears that a pair of “I’s” played a part in his production reduction – Injuries and Inconsistency.

The interesting point to note is that Duclair’s rookie QMJHL numbers were second to only one other Under-17 player that year – 2013’s number one draft pick Nathan MacKinnon. In their 2012 Draft Guide, ISS listed Duclair as the 28th best prospect as they looked ahead to the 2013 NHL Draft.

The talent and tools are there, it is just a matter of finding a tool bag for all of those tools. Even I have to admit that Duclair’s chances at making an impact with the Rangers is better with Alain Vigneault as coach then they would be with John Tortorella behind the bench. Duclair’s defensive lapses would have driven Torts batty.

Duclair received the following pre-draft rankings: CS (#57 North American skater), ISS (#64), THN (#55), and McK (#72).

Here is Duclair’s ISS Scouting Report: “Duclair has battled adversity this tear; injury early in [the] year and some inconsistent play, but [he] worked through and became a good offensive contributor with a +23 rating. When he is on his game he can be difficult to handle one-on-one and is dangerous in the offensive zone … when he is not, he looks like a career CHL player. Luckily for him, we have seen him at his best and believe he will mature and has top 6 upside with added maturity and consistency in compete level. He is not strong and that does force him to rely on his skating and stick skills too heavily.”

THN wrote that scouts compare his abilities to that of Marian Gaborik and Alexander Semin on one hand while questioning his consistency. “The tools are there, but he’s inconsistent. You never know what you are going to get from this kid,” one scout told THN.

Another scout related to THN, “Because there’s so much talent, people think there’s more there, whereas I accept them for what they are. The key to Duclair is the team that gets him had better be patient and understanding with him. If they are, they’re going to be rewarded.”

THN wrote that a third scout told them “Duclair has done a better job this season slowing the game down, which allows him to be more creative with the puck rather than just using his speed. His junior numbers haven’t caught up to his skill.” THN projects him as a “Skilled Forward”.

Kyle Woodlief of Red Line Report said that Duclair is “very difficult to contain when he’s at full throttle, and can make plays at top speed, but has tendency to stay outside on the rush, not often cutting inside or driving to the net.”

Duclair and teammate Adam Erne earned one-game suspensions from coach Patrick Roy over “indifferent play”. Duclair also missed time during the season with an ankle injury (almost six weeks) just three games and eight points) into the season. I suppose there is a question to whether Duclair had an attitude problem or it was just a clash between coach and player.

One positive in Duclair’s favor is that, according to Cerny, growing up in Montreal Duclair’s father’s favorite team was the New York Rangers.

Another positive in his favor is that Duclair knows he needs to ramp up his game.

“I have a lot of speed, that’s one of my biggest assets as a player, and I love to compete,” Duclair told Cerny on Draft day. “I have been compared to Evander Kane, which is an honor, of course. But I’m not coming off the greatest season, I’m not going to lie. After my rookie season (in Quebec) I was projected as first rounder, then I got hurt at the beginning of this year and fell a bit (in the draft). So I want to prove to myself first that I am still a top prospect.”

After their trio of the third round, the Blueshirts did not draft again until the 4th round. With the 110th selection they drafted Prince Edward Island defenseman Ryan Graves. In 68 games last season, his second in the QMJHL, the 6-foot-4 and 220 pound blueliner scored 3 goals and 13 assists. He was the 116th ranked North American skater by CS (up two places from his Mid-Term ranking) and was ranked #135 by ISS.

Although a Rangers draft pick, Graves will be playing for the Islanders next season – PEI’s new ownership has rebranded the team as the Charlottetown Islanders. Graves was the 9th overall pick in the 2011 QMJHL Draft – the same Draft that saw Nathan MacKinnon go 1st overall.

“After the third round you’re looking for things that stand out. Ryan Graves, he’s a big 6’4” defenseman and I would say he had an average first half and then the second half of the year his play just went up hill,” Clark told HockeyScene.com.

Here is Graves’ ISS Scouting Report: “Has size and good backwards mobility, but forward mobility is very average. Stride is short and choppy. Looks like defensive D, puck skill is average. Good defensive read and positioning, but has a tendency to get locked on guys in D zone and run around a bit for a hit. Plays with some grit and does not back down from confrontation. He possesses good size with the potential to really fill out and get stronger as he develops. Always willing to stand up for teammates, Graves is still working on game-to-game consistency and is an unpolished long-term project on defense.”

The Rangers fifth and final selection of the 2013 NHL Draft came in the 6th round when they selected goaltender Mackenzie Skapski with the 170th overall pick. The 6-foot-2 and 186 pound goalie was born the day after the Rangers last won the Stanley Cup.

Skapski entered the 2013 NHL Draft as the 17th ranked North American goalie by CS. However, he is no stranger to the NHL scene as he was invited to the Minnesota Wild’s 2012 Development Camp.

After spending the 2011/2012 season as the backup goalie to Nathan Lieuwen (Buffalo’s 2011 6th round pick), Skapski stepped into the starting role last year with Kootenay. In 65 games, Skapski posted a 35-25-1-0 record with a 2.78 GAA and a .910 SV%.

Jess Rubinstein of Prospect Park wrote, “[Skapski] is also coached by former Hartford coach Ryan McGill and was the starter for the Ice playing in 65 games with a decent 2.78 GAA and a 0.910 save percentage off a 34-25-1-0 with 7 shutouts. Skapski is an older draftee as this was his 2nd time through the draft. Had a great 2nd half in the 2012-13 season including Goalie of the Month for February as he went 22-7-1 to help Kootenay earn a playoff spot.”

Justin Goldman of McKeen’s Hockey wrote, “I had him targeted as a “below-the-radar” pick after a breakout season in Kootenay. He was passed over in last year’s draft, but played in 65 games this season in the WHL and tied a league-high seven shutouts. He was invited to the Wild’s development camp last summer, where I had a chance to see him up close, and liked his combination of size and athleticism.”

Given how he battled back from adversity about four years ago, making the jump from the WHL to the NHL should be a piece of cake.

Dan Kinvig of the Abbotsford (BC) News relates the following story.

On Dec. 11, 2009, Skapski was on the bus with the Fraser Valley Bruins major midget squad when the vehicle hit some black ice just south of Williams Lake, skidded off the highway and landed on its side.

Skapski suffered the most serious injuries of anyone on the team – he sustained a broken nose and a fractured orbital bone, and had surgery to place a couple of plates in his cheek and to remove a blood clot beside his brain. During his convalescence, he lost 30 pounds, dropping from 155 to 125.

But he battled back, and earned a roster spot with the WHL’s Kootenay Ice in 2011-12 …. Skapski got into just 19 games, though, and was passed over in the 2012 NHL draft, his first year of eligibility.

According to Kinvig, Skapski father, Denis, played two seasons of NCAA hockey at the University of Alabama-Huntsville and then played briefly in the ECHL with the Columbus Chill and the Roanoke Valley Rampage. Unlike his son, Dad was a defenseman.

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