On the day prior to the NHL draft, the NHL’s Board of Governors voted to change the way the league conducts its annual Draft Lottery.

According to an article appearing online at TSN, “The league has proposed smoothing or compressing the odds among the 14 non-playoff teams for the 2015 draft and then increasing the number of selections determined by the lottery in 2016.”

During meetings held during the Stanley Cup Final, the article says that Buffalo GM Tim Murray told TSN’s Pierre LeBrun that the changes would not be in effect for the 2015 Draft which features Connor McDavid and Jack Eichel.

The NHL Players’s Association would have to vote to ratify any changes before they could be implemented.

In this Second Round Mock Draft, each player has ratings for the following scouting services: NHL’s Central Scouting (CS), The Hockey News (THN), and International Scouting Service (ISS). CS breaks down their ratings by North American skaters (NAS), European skaters (ES), North American goaltenders (NAG) and European goaltenders (EG). THN lists each prospect’s NHL Translation while ranking skaters and goaltenders together. ISS provides a prospects’ comparable NHL player and has separate rankings for skaters and goaltenders.

The Draft positions utilized are those as of June 26, 2014.

31. BUFFALO SABRES – Jack Glover – D
CS: # 38 NAS —– THN: # 38 (Big, mobile defenseman)
ISS: # 44 (Ben Lovejoy)
The right-handed shot will continue his development at the University of Minnesota. Glover combines good size (6-3/190) with solid skating ability. While he still has some room to grow his game, he has the right work ethic needed to take his game to the next level.

32. FLORIDA PANTHERS – Thatcher Demko – G
CS: # 1 NAG —– THN: # 28 (Franchise goaltender)
ISS: # 1 G (Not Available)
The Roberto Luongo deal took care of Florida’s current goaltending needs, but left a hole in the future with trading of Jakub Markstrom. Demko gives the Panthers hope for the future. The 6-4/195 Demko took over Boston College’s goalie duties as freshman and never looked back. He uses that size well as he switches from a stand-up style to the butterfly as the need warrants. He is expected to backstop Team USA in the WJC.

33. ST. LOUIS BLUES – Ryan MacInnis – C
CS: # 20 NAS —– THN: # 44 (Two-way center)
ISS: # 25 (Jordan Staal)
Ryan is the son of Blues VP of Operations Al MacInnis. While he doesn’t have his dad’s shot (then again, who does), MacInnis is a versatile center who plays a solid game at both ends of the ice. While he has nice size (6-3/183), he still has some room to grow as he matures and gets stronger.

34. CALGARY FLAMES – Jack Dougherty – D
CS: # 30 NAS —– THN: # 25 (Offensive defenseman)
ISS: # 42 (Jason Woolley)
Dougherty originally committed to Ohio State, but he left for the University of Wisconsin when Buckeyes coach Mark Osiecki was fired. Dougherty’s attributes are those that all NHL teams look for: right-handed shot, speed and mobility – with a good dose of hockey sense.

35. NEW YORK ISLANDERS – Alex Nedeljkovic – G
CS: # 4 NAG —– THN: # 45 (Starting goaltender)
ISS: # 3 G (Not available)
If Demko doesn’t lead the USA at the WJC, then Nedeljkovic will – following up his gold medal performance at the U-18. That was a big accomplishment for a player who wasn’t developed within the USNTDP. Alex’s reflexes, anticipation and positioning are at a high level and help compensate for his average size (6-0/184).

36. VANCOUVER CANUCKS – Alex Peters – D
CS: # 56 NAS —– THN: # 68 (Not available)
ISS: # 47 (Marc Staal)
Peters has the one thing that you can’t teach – size (6-3/207). As big as he is, Peters still has room to grow his physical game. Peters, the younger brother of Carolina goalie Justin Peters, is a defensive d-man who is very good at reading the play – especially in the defensive end. He has above average skating skills for someone his size and has a good shot from the point.

37. CAROLINA HURRICANES – Mason McDonald – G
CS: # 2 NAG —– THN: # 52 (Project goaltender)
ISS: # 2 G (Not available)
Whether or not the ‘canes move Cam Ward, the team needs to move to start finding an eventual replacement. His size (6-4/185) and his right-handed catching glove will present problems for opponents. His development was slow until he was traded in the QMJHL. That paved the way for McDonald to lead Team Canada to a bronze medal at the U-18.

38. ANAHEIM DUCKS – Domenik Masin – D
CS: # 10 ES —– THN: # 35 (Two-way defenseman)
ISS: # 55 (Josh Gorges)
Masin (as in machine) captained the Czech Republic to a silver medal in the U-18. At 6-2/189, Masin is not afraid to use his size and led all Czech Republic Junior league players in PIMs (102). Masin is a solid two-way defenseman who has the skating and offensive ability to join the rush. He is a solid leader and is a strong character player.

39. BUFFALO SABRES – Nick Schmaltz – C/RW
CS: # 19 NAS —– THN: # 31 (Dynamic point producer)
ISS: # 24 (Alex Semin)
Nick’s brother Jordan was St. Louis’ 1st round pick in 2012. Nick is expected to move from the USHL and join his brother at the University of North Dakota. He has natural offensive skills where he is more playmaker than goal scorer at this point in his career. He will need to work on his defensive zone coverage and he will need to get stronger and bulk up his frame (5-11/172).

40. OTTAWA SENATORS – Vladislav Kamenev – C/LW
CS: # 13 ES —– THN: # 56 (Enigmatic scorer)
ISS: # 29 (Eric Staal)
The specter of the KHL very well may cost Kamenev a shot at a 1st round selection. Kamenev was Russia’s captain at the U-18 where he was their leading scorer (seven points in five games). While he has good size (6-2/185), Kamenev needs to learn to play more in traffic. Outside of that, Kamenev is a solid skater who features a big shot.

41. NEW JERSEY DEVILS – Brendan Lemieux – LW
CS: # 28 NAS —– THN: # 37 (Agitating forward)
ISS: # 34 (Claude Lemieux)
The younger Lemieux does play a physical game, but he does not play on the uber-pest level that his father did. Brendan is a smart two-way forward who is tough to play against. He is a player who can add offense to a defensive third line or defense to an offensive second line.

42. NASHVILLE PREDATORS – John Quenneville – C
CS: # 23 NAS —– THN: # 36 (Solid point producer)
ISS: # 41 (Scott Hartnell)
Quenneville’s hockey bloodlines run deep. His second cousin is Chicago’s coach, his brother-in-law is Johnny Boychuk and his older brother Peter was a 7th round pick of Columbus and John’s teammate in Brandon. Quenneville is a tenacious player who uses his talents well when forechecking, while having good offensive skills.

43. ARIZONA COYOTES – Brett Pollock – C
CS: # 34 NAS —– THN: # 33 (Solid point producer)
ISS: # 36 (Kris Beech)
At 6-2/182, Pollock combines NHL size with a soft touch around the net. He will do whatever it takes to score and has variety of means to do so. His NHL ceiling could be even higher if he is able to strengthen his skating and work on improving his play in the defensive zone.

44. WASHINTON CAPITALS – Eric Cornel – C
CS: # 25 NAS —– THN: # 41 (Two-way center)
ISS: # 37 (Jared Aulin)
Cornel saw his numbers jump big-time from his first to second years with Peterborough (16 points to 62). He is a solid two-way player who is more of playmaker than scorer. While his size isn’t a problem (6-1/186), Cornel still needs to get stronger and work on using his size more effectively.

45. DALLAS STARS – Adam Ollas Mattsson – D
CS: # 15 ES —– THN: # 98 (Not available)
ISS: # 50 (Niklas Hjalmarsson)
Mattsson is a solid defensive blueliner who has the ability to make a smart first pass out of his zone. The 6-4/216 Mattsson has NHL size already and he isn’t afraid to use it. He will need to work on his skating which is average at best. He has the ability and natural talent to become a shutdown defenseman.

46. NASHVILLE PREDATORS – Brycen Martin – D
CS: # 26 NAS —– THN: # 51 (Offensive defenseman)
ISS: # 63 (Not available)
Martin is a good skater with strong puckhandling skills. The best part of his game is his ability to make that first pass out of the zone. It also causes him some problems because he lets mistakes carry over from one shift to another. In addition to starting the breakouts, Martin has the offensive ability to join the rush and utilize good offensive abilities.

47. COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS – Andreas Englund – D
CS: # 30 ES —– THN: # 46 (Defensive defenseman)
ISS: # 67 (Not available)
Englund (6-3/189) is a defensive defenseman who knows his limitations on the ice. He is a good skater for his size and has good puckhandling skills, but he does not that have much of an offensive game. With that said, he will do whatever it takes defensively to win.

48. PHILADELPHIA FLYERS – Justin Kirkland – LW
CS: # 67 NAS —– THN: # 54 (Two-way forward)
ISS: # 35 (Blake Wheeler)
As a 17-year-old, Kirkland had a strong rookie season for Kelowna (WHL) with 48 points (17-31) in 68 games. At 6-2/175, Kirkland is still growing into his body and will continue to develop as a high-energy power forward type of player. Kirkland improved as the season progressed and tallied 10 points in 14 playoff games.

49. BUFFALO SABRES – Ryan Collins – D
CS: # 57 NAS —– THN: # 55 (Defensive defenseman)
ISS: # 52 (Bryan Allen)
The 6-5/202 Collins has the ability to impact a game based on his size and defensive play. Enrolled at the University of Minnesota, Collins has the abilities to add an offensive component to his game based on his first pass and good shot. As an imposing right-handed shooting d-man, Collins is a tempting prospect who might need an extra year or so to develop his game.

50. TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING – Brayden Point – C
CS: # 31 NAS —– THN: # 42 (Dynamic point producer)
ISS: # 38 (Derek Roy)
At 5-9/160, the only thing holding Point back is his size. However, the organization that gave Martin St. Louis his big chance is not going to shy away from a talent like Point. His skating game is built more on being elusive than speedy, but it is his hockey sense and overall offensive skills that allows Point to thrive.

51. SAN JOSE SHARKS – Nikolai Goldobin – RW
CS: # 24 NAS —– THN: # 34 (Pure goal scorer)
ISS: # 28 (Gustav Nyquist)
The Russian-born Goldobin left home two years ago to play in Sarnia (OHL) and saw his point total rise from 68 (30-38) to 94 (38-56) – a total that was 2nd to Michael Dal Colle among all draft-eligible OHL prospects. Goldobin’s superb puckhandling is the key to his offensive game. He needs to work on improving his defensive and physical play.

52. ST. LOUIS BLUES – Dylan Sadowy – C/LW
CS: # 33 NAS —– THN: # 76 (Not available)
ISS: # 46 (Brendan Gallagher)
Sadowy is a solid two-way player who can play in all situations. Sadowy showed a development in his offensive game at Saginaw (OHL) as he went from two goals in 2012/2013 to 27 last season. While his offensive game is still a work in progress, his defensive game and compete level are high.

53. SAN JOSE SHARKS – Anton Karlsson – RW
CS: # 11 ES —– THN: # 86 (Not available)
ISS: # 31 (David Backes)
As the Sharks continue to find a way to get to the Stanley Cup Final, having a player like Karlsson will help. The 6-1/187 RW is a versatile winger who uses his size to score in the high-contact areas thanks to his tenacity and strong hockey sense. His physical game makes him a valuable asset along the boards and on the forecheck.

54. CALGARY FLAMES – Nicolas Aube-Kubel –RW
CS: # 40 NAS —– THN: # 60 (Top-nine forward)
ISS: # 73 (Not available)
Aube-Kubel played in all three situations in his second season with Val-d’Or (QMJHL) as he improved from 27 points (10-17) to 53 (22-31). At this point of his development, Aube-Kubel’s game is a defensive player with a developing offensive skillset. His offensive development will be based on his ability to use his hockey sense to elevate his offense.

55. ANAHEIM DUCKS – Shane Eiserman – LW
CS: # 45 NAS —– THN: # Not Rated in the Top 100 (Not available)
ISS: # 48 (Brandon Dubinsky)
Eiserman in enrolled at the University of New Hampshire. The winger left the USNTDP last year to jump to Dubuque (USHL) where he scored 16 goals and 24 assists in 53 games. At 6-1/200, Eiserman is a potential power forward who succeeds as a two-way forward. He used his size and skating to wreak havoc on the forecheck. He uses those same attributes to drive to the net and work the high-contact areas of the ice.

56. BOSTON BRUINS – Johnathan MacLeod – D
CS: # 44NAS —– THN: # 32 (Defensive defenseman)
ISS: # 72 (Not available)
Although committed to Boston University, THN wondered if his development would be better playing Junior hockey with Moncton (QMJHL). MacLeod was the 7th d-man for Team USA at the U-18. He uses his size (6-2/200) and hockey sense to play a defensive style. With the defensive size locked down, he needs to work on improving his offensive skills by improving his average skating and puckhandling skills.

57. NEW YORK ISLANDERS – Juho Lammikko – LW
CS: # 14 ES —– THN: # 83 (Not available)
ISS: # 49 (Kyle Okposo)
Lammikko uses his size (6-1/180) to gain time and position so that he can utilize his heavy shot. He is a solid player at both ends of the ice and is willing to do what is necessary to win. He split time in Finland in the men’s league and the junior league.

58. ARIZONA COYOTES – Oskar Lindblom – LW
CS: # 23 ES —– THN: # Not Rated in Top 100 (Not available)
ISS: # 51 (Johan Franzen)
Lindblom is another solid two-way forward who has the body and willingness to work his way to the slot thanks to his nose for the net. While he uses his strength to be strong on the puck, Lindblom needs to work on his skating. The best part of his game is that he is already a North American style of player.

59. NEW YORK RANGERS – Hunter Smith – RW
CS: # 39 NAS —– THN: # 49 (Power forward)
ISS: # 39 (Shawn Thornton)
The knock on the Rangers during their Stanley Cup Final against the Kings was their lack of size. The 6-6/210 Smith should go a long way to help bring more of a physical presence to NY. Smith went undrafted last year after tallying a goal and an assist in 45 games during 2011-12 and 2012-13. This season he scored 16 goals and 24 assists in 64 games. Smith will need to improve his skating and defensive play if he wants to go beyond being a third/fourth line player.

60. LOS ANGELES KINGS – Ryan Donato – C
CS: # 58 NAS —– THN: # 40 (Dynamic point producer)
ISS: # 100 (Not available)
Donato is set to join his father Ted, who is the coach at Harvard, starting with the 2015-16 season. In the meantime, Donato has to decide if he will return to Dexter H.S. next year or will he look to go to the USHL (Omaha) or the British Columbia Hockey League. One would expect Ryan will consult with his father and his eventual draft team. Donato is a strong two-way player who sees the ice and uses his puckhandling abilities to be a skilled playmaker. He will have to raise his level of play as he steps up in leagues and competition.

Second Round Draft Pick Transactions
1. The Edmonton Oilers’’ second-round pick will go to the St. Louis Blues as the result of a trade on July 10, 2013 that sent David Perron to Edmonton in exchange for Magnus Paajarvi and this pick.
2. The Toronto Maple Leafs’ second-round pick will go to the Anaheim Ducks as the result of a trade on November 16, 2013 that sent Peter Holland and Brad Staubitz to Toronto in exchange for Jesse Blacker, Anaheim’s seventh-round pick in 2014 and this pick (being conditional at the time of the trade). The condition – Anaheim will receive a second-round pick in 2014 if Holland plays in 25 or more games for the Maple Leafs during the 2013-14 NHL season – was converted on January 18, 2014.
3. The Winnipeg Jets’ second-round pick will go to the Buffalo Sabres as the result of a trade on March 5, 2014 that sent Matt Moulson and Cody McCormick to Minnesota for Torrey Mitchell, a second-round pick in 2016 and this pick.
Minnesota previously acquired this pick as the result of a trade on July 5, 2013 that sent Devin Setoguchi to Winnipeg in exchange for this pick.
4. The Detroit Red Wings’ second-round pick will go to the Nashville Predators as the result of a trade on March 5, 2014 that sent David Legwand to Detroit in exchange for Patrick Eaves, Calle Jarnkrok, and this pick (being conditional at the time of the trade). The condition – Nashville will receive a second-round pick in 2014 if Detroit qualifies for the 2014 Stanley Cup Playoffs – was converted on April 9, 2014.
5. The Minnesota Wild’s second-round pick will go to the Buffalo Sabres as the result of trade on April 3, 2013 that sent Jason Pominville and a fourth-round pick in 2014 to Minnesota in exchange for Matt Hackett, Johan Larsson, a first-round pick in 2013 and this pick.
6. The Pittsburgh Penguins’ second-round pick will go to the San Jose Sharks as the result of a trade on March 25, 2013 that sent Douglas Murray to Pittsburgh in exchange for a second-round pick in 2013 and this pick (being conditional at the time of the trade). The condition – If Pittsburgh wins two rounds in the 2013 playoffs or if Murray re-signs with Pittsburgh, then San Jose will receive Pittsburgh’s second-round pick in 2014 – was converted on May 24, 2013 when Pittsburgh advanced to the 2013 Eastern Conference Finals.
7. The Colorado Avalanche’s second-round pick will go to the Calgary Flames as the result of a trade on March 5, 2014 that sent Reto Berra to Colorado in exchange for this pick.[
8. The Montreal Canadiens’ second-round pick will go to the New York Islanders as the result of a trade on March 5, 2014 that sent Thomas Vanek and a conditional fifth-round pick in 2014 to Montreal in exchange for Sebastian Collberg and this pick (being conditional at the time of the trade). The condition – New York will receive a second-round pick in 2014 if Montreal qualifies for the 2014 Stanley Cup Playoffs – was converted on April 1, 2014.
9. The Chicago Blackhawks’ second-round pick will go to the Arizona Coyotes as the result of a trade on March 4, 2014 that sent David Rundblad and Mathieu Brisebois to Chicago in exchange for this pick.[
10. Los Angeles re-acquired their second-round pick as the result of a trade on March 5, 2014 that sent Hudson Fasching and Nicolas Deslauriers to Buffalo in exchange for Brayden McNabb, Jonathan Parker, Los Angeles’ second-round pick in 2015 and this pick.
Buffalo previously acquired this pick as the result of a trade on April 1, 2013 that sent Robyn Regehr to Los Angeles in exchange for a second-round pick in 2015 and this pick.

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